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The Traditional Feast of Christ the King

You may notice that today, we post the Feast of the Kingship of our Lord Jesus Christ or mostly known as the Feast of Christ the King. While the world knows that this feast was celebrated on the last Sunday of November, we post it in the last Sunday of October. The reason is because today, is the original date of this feast before Pope Paul VI moved it.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 7 – Covid19, The Traditional Mass and the Pope

Traditional Catholic societies have suffered in the past because of their brethren in the Church. They condemned the movement of these societies because they believe that the traditional way of life is not fitting in with the modern world, just like the Vatican II taught. Though many Catholics, including those who did not experience the Tridentine Rite, treat the Novus Ordo Mass as the Traditional one. Even though the Novus Ordo Mass started out as solemn, it has gradually introduced more Protestant gestures that remove the holy sacrifice of the Mass.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 6 – The Summorum Pontificum

The Tridentine Mass or the Traditional Latin Mass is still restricted and can only be attended by the parishes or churches that are under the Traditional Catholic Societies or communities. Since the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) has its bishops unlike other Traditional societies, they slowly built churches in every part of the world where some people discover the beauty of the Traditional Latin Mass. And since many Traditional Societies have been formed in the past years after the promulgation of the Novus Ordo Mass, followers of the Traditional societies are spreading the word of the importance and truth about the Sacred Tradition and the Sacred Rite of the Holy Mass.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 5 – The Birth of the Traditional Societies

When Archbishop Lefebvre established the Society of St. Pius X (where he used the name of Pope St. Pius X because of the Saint’s battle against the evil of Modernism) following the promulgation of Pope Paul VI’s Mass, also known as the Novus Ordo Mass, it caused controversy in the Catholic Church but provided hope for those who still adhere to the Catholic Tradition. When Pope John Paul II declared Archbishop Lefebvre and his newly consecrated bishop to be schismatic, they were automatically excommunicated (but not the whole SSPX).

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 4 – The Society of St. Pius X

Following Vatican II, we are now witnessing changes in our church. Perhaps some of us, including Millenials and Gen-Z, are unaware that our Holy Mass has become more like a protestant service since Pope Paul VI instituted the Novus Ordo Mass, in which the priest now faces the people, the language has become vernacular, and Gregorian Chant has been replaced by modern music. Liturgical dances and applause are now included in the Holy Mass, and some parishes have their own version of the Mass, which Pope St. Pius V fixed when he promulgated the Tridentine Mass to unite the Church. The Church is now open to other religions, with the Pope and Cardinals visiting different religions, participating in their rituals, and praying to their gods, which violates God's first commandment.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 3 – The Vatican II Council and Archbishop Lefebvre

Following Pope St. Pius V's reformation in 1570, which is focused on Sacred Tradition, including the Holy Mass, the truth, and strengthening Catholic faith, there are no reforms in the following centuries. When modernism gradually infiltrated the church, causing some changes such as the Holy Mass, Pope St. Pius X fought the evil of modernism and restored everything to Christ. When St. Pius X died, modernists in the Catholic Church seized the opportunity to present their ideas to the Church, but they were unable to do so because the subsequent Popes also denied modernism. Then, in 1962, Pope John XXIII convened the Vatican II Council, which focuses on Modernism, the Liturgical Movement, and Ecumenism - a reunion with other Christian denominations such as the Protestants.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 2 – The Modernism and Pope St. Pius X

The Catholic Church has remained faithful to Sacred Scripture and Holy Tradition over the past centuries. In the 1500s, the Protestant Reformation occurred, and the Council of Trent was created in response. This council made a strong counter-reformation, which was strengthened by Pope Pius V by making the church more disciplined and uniting it by promulgating the Tridentine Mass. Then, over the course of the twentieth century, many things changed and the modern era arrived. That is where modernism comes into play.

Defending the Sacred Tradition Part 1 – St. Pius V and Martin Luther

After the Ascension of our Lord into Heaven and the Descent of the Holy Spirit upon our Lady and the Apostles, the Church has faced numerous challenges, including persecutions from the Jews, the Roman Empire and other pagan nations. The demon used it to destroy the Church from the outside. Yet he also attempted to destroy the Church from within. There have been prior attempts to wreak havoc on the Church. Including critiques of corruption by a Catholic priest named John Wycliffe. But it was until 1517, when Martin Luther, an Augustinian Friar who wrote his ninety-five theses protesting against the sale of indulgences, became the wick of the Protestant Reformation.

The Dogmas of the Virgin Mary Part Four – The Assumption

On November 1, 1950, at Saint Peter’s Square, Pope Pius XII declared the Munificentissimus Deus. The Munificentissimus Deus stated that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-Virgin Mary, was taken up both body and soul into Heaven when she completed her mortal life. That is what the Pope declared at that time. How come that the Assumption of the Virgin Mary occurred? The Bible does not state anything about the Assumption, so how come the Catholics have a dogma about it? Remember that Catholic Church’s teachings come from three sources: Tradition, Sacred Scriptures, and the Magisterium. The Assumption is not in the Sacred Scriptures.

The Council of Trent

When the false teachings of Martin Luther spread all over Europe, many faithful left the Catholic Church and started building their own church or joined some protestant churches according to their liking. This event led to Counter-Reformation by starting the Council of Trent.

The Poison Called Heresy

During the early centuries of Christianity, a number of false beliefs and ideas surfaced and attacked the Truth taught by Our Lord Jesus Christ and spread by the Apostles. An example of these false beliefs is the question on Christ's Divinity, where some bishops and priests taught that Jesus is only man and not God. These teaching bore another heresy against the Marian Dogma of Theotokus or Mother of God, where they contested that the Blessed Virgin Mary is only the Mother of Christ and not the Mother of God. These myths and false doctrines poisoned the wells of Christian faith and deceived a number of faithful throughout the centuries. Even in today's modern world, these false teachings are rehashed and continued to lead the flock astray from the Truth. We call these poisonous doctrines as Heresy.

The Dogmas of the Blessed Virgin Mary  Part Four –  The Assumption

On November 1, 1950, at Saint Peter’s Square, Pope Pius XII declared the Munificentissimus Deus. The Munificentissimus Deus stated that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-Virgin Mary, was taken up both body and soul into Heaven when she completed her mortal life. That is what the Pope declared at that time. How come that the Assumption of the Virgin Mary occurred? The Bible does not state anything about the Assumption, so how come the Catholics have a dogma about it? Remember that Catholic Church’s teachings come from three sources: Tradition, Sacred Scriptures, and the Magisterium. The Assumption is not in the Sacred Scriptures.

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